Lox recalled for botulism potential

Salmon lox that is potentially contaminated with Clostridium botulinum has been voluntarily recalled by Seabear Company, based in Anacortes, Washington. The company is recalling 1225 units of 3-ounce packages of Cold Smoked Wild Coho Salmon Lox as consuming the product may lead to a type of food poisoning called botulism.

The lox is sold under the Gerard & Dominique Seafoods brand. Recalled products can be identified by lot # CSCO-17339, Pack Date 17-340, UPC 7 52047 92635 4. Consumers are warned not to eat the lox, even if it does not appear or smell spoiled. The potentially contaminated product was distributed directly to distributors in California, Maryland, and Washington between 12/8/17 and 4/10/18 and may have been further distributed and sold through retail stores at least in these states.

Seabear initiated the recall voluntarily when the lox’s water phase salt testing was found to be below 3.5%. Normal food safety instructions for thawing and serving the lox state that the product can be frozen or refrigerated and can be kept unopened in the refrigerator for up to 30 days. However, because the water phase salt is under 3.5%, the recalled salmon lox product would have to remain frozen until ready to consume. Keeping the product in the refrigerator after thawing in a reduced oxygen package could result in potential contamination with Clostridium botulinum.

Botulism is a potentially fatal form of food poisoning that can cause general weakness, dizziness, double-vision and trouble with speaking or swallowing. Difficulty in breathing, weakness of other muscles, abdominal distension and constipation may also be common symptoms. There is a wide time-frame in which symptoms of food poisoning may appear. For some, symptoms can be apparent in as little as six hours, while others might not have symptoms for 10 days.

For more information about the salmon lox recall and about the potential effects of botulism, please contact the food poisoning lawyers at 1-888-335-4901 and speak to a botulism lawyer.