General Mills E. Coli Lawsuit:  At least 63 Victims Identified in an Outbreak of E. coli O121 and O26 are Candidates for a General Mills E. Coli Lawsuit Alleging Damages Due to Consumption of Contaminated Flour Products

The FDA began investigating the source of E. coli after an unusually large number of non-O157:H7  cases were being reported.  The trace-back investigation eventually led investigators to identified flour from General Mills as the source of this outbreak, and investigators contacted the company.  On May 31, 2016, following the conference call, General Mills issued a recall of flour products produced between November 14, 2015 and December 4, 2015.

As the investigation continued, the FDA found both E. coli O121, and E.coli O26 in the flour, and the recall was expanded to include additional products.  By September 29, the CDC ws reporting that 63 victims had been identified with the outbreak strains of E.coli O121 or O26 in 24 states. The first victim wa dentified after becoming ill on December 21, 2015 and the last on September 5, 2016. At least 17 victims required hospitalization, with one hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a dangerous and potentially deadly side-effect of STEC.

While the CDC believes the main outbreak is over, because of the long shelf life of flour, there is a chance additional victims may be identified.

How did Victims get E. coli from Flour?  Reports Include Customers Eating Raw Dough

The FDA confirmed that the General Mills flour that was produced between November 2015 and February 10, 2016 at the General Mills facility in Kansas City, Missouri.  The flour was widely sold, in  stores nationwide, under a number of names, including Gold Medal flour, Signature Kitchens flour and Gold Medal Wondra flour. The four subject to recall includes unbleached, all-purpose, and self-

FDA and CDC Collaborate to Confirm Source as General Mills Flour: At Least 63 Individuals Candidates for a General Mills E. Coli Lawsuit

In the weeks following the first announced case, the FDA was able to isolate E. coli O121 in open packages of the flour in the homes of Arizona and Oklahoma victims. Further analysis of the E.coli O121 confirmed that they were the outbreaks trains. Since one of the products was produced outside the original production dates subject to recall on July 1, 2016 General Mills expanded its recall.

A further expansion of the recall was issued on July 25, 2016.

For more information about a General Mills E. Coli Lawsuit, or to speak to an E. coli lawyer, call 1-888-335-4901.