Fresh Express Issues Recall for Salad Kits Contaminated with E. coli

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    Fresh Express Issues Recall for Salad Kits Contaminated with E. coli
    Fresh Express Issues Recall for Salad Kits Contaminated with E. coli

    Fresh Express Issues Issues Yet Anohter Recall – This Time for Salad Kits Contaminated with E. coli

                Fresh Express has issued a recall for Caesar salad kits after finding traces of E. coli 026 in a sample. Although the salad kit is past its expiration date, Fresh Express issued the recall out of an abundance of caution after a randomly selected package of 10.5 oz. Fresh Express Kit Caesar Supreme tested positive for traces of E. coli 026 STEC. The recall was issued for 10.5 oz. Fresh Express Kit Caesar Supreme with the Use-by Date of November 8, 2020, UPC code 0 7127930104 4, and Product Code S296. Distributed primarily in Western and Southwestern areas, the product was possibly distributed in the following states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. Fresh Express previously caused a nationwide Cyclospora outbreak in which nearly 700 infections were reported and multiple lawsuits were filed by Ron Simon and Associates.

                No illnesses have been reported as of date due to the Caesar salads. Customers who have purchased the contaminated salad are urged not to consume it; rather they can return it to the store of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with any questions regarding the recall can contact Fresh Express at 1-800-242-5472 during the hours of 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. EST.

                National E. coli lawyer Ron Simon stated that, “If there are any illnesses related to the contaminated bagged salad, they are likely to be reported in the coming weeks, as customers become aware that the salads were contaminated and begin to show symptoms of an E. coli infection.” Consumers with STEC infections typically present symptoms three to four days after consumption, though some patients have reported symptoms beginning within a day or after more than a week post-consumption.

                 E. coli is a bacteria found in the digestive tract of both humans and adults, and while the majority of E. Coli strands are harmless, a few select strands can cause severe gastrointestinal illness, which are called Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). The majority of patients with a STEC infection report symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, and fatigue. If you believe you are suffering from a STEC infection, contact your physician immediately.

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