UPDATE:  98 Victims in 22 States: Source of e. coli tied to romaine lettuce still not identified – Romaine Lettuce E. coli Lawyer

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has still not identified the specific source of the romaine lettuce contaminated with e. coli that has made so many people sick in the past few weeks. The lettuce was likely grown or originated from the winter growing areas in Yuma, Arizona. However, beyond that no grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has yet been pinpointed.

The FDA reports that on April 19, 2018, Alaska health partners announced that several people in a correctional facility were infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7. These individuals ate whole-head romaine lettuce from Yuma, Arizona. Based on this new information, the FDA is advising that consumers avoid all romaine lettuce from Yuma, Arizona.

Part of the issue in identifying the source of the contamination is the manner in which romaine lettuce is typically packaged. The available packaging for the lettuce that has caused the food poisoning provides very limited information on the source of the products.

If you cannot determine the source of your romaine lettuce, throw it away and don’t eat it. If you are in a restaurant, ask if their romaine lettuce comes from the Yuma, Arizona, region.

There are no 84 cases of illnesses related to romaine lettuce, in 19 states: Alaska (5), Arizona (5), California (13), Colorado (2), Connecticut (2), Georgia (1), Idaho (10), Illinois (1), Louisiana (1), Michigan (2), Missouri (1), Montana (7), New Jersey (7), New York (2), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (18), South Dakota (1), Virginia (1), and Washington (2).

If you have consumed romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona, area or are experiencing illness from e. coli contamination, or want to talk to someone about a Romaine lettuce E. coli lawsuit, contact the food poisoning lawyers at 1-888-335-4901.  Experienced lawyers can help you file a Romaine lettuce e. coli lawsuit.    Talk to a Romaine Lettuce Ecoli Lawyer about filing a Romaine lettuce e coli lawsuit.