Idaho’s Central District Health Department (CDHD) has updated the results of its investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella affecting patrons of the Boise Co-Op Deli who purchased food from June 1 – 10, 2015, including those who purchased food sold at the airport in Boise, where the Boise Co-Op sells food at airport kiosks. According to the CDHD, through the end of July investigators had identified approximately 300 cases of Salmonella food poisoning – many of these victims are represented by the Salmonella lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates, who set up a Boise Co-Op Salmonella Claim Center: 1-888-335-4901.

The investigation, which is not yet complete, compelled the Boise Co-Op Deli to close for cleaning, reorganization, and retraining of its staff – according to Boise Co-Op spokesperson, “we’re using this opportunity to do some thorough cleaning, organizing, re-structuring, and re-training . . . our dedicated deli crew is scrubbing out cases, steam-cleaning appliances, sanitizing, and then sanitizing a second time . . . we are working with CDHD to make sure that we are doing everything we can to ensure safe food handling practices and root out the source of this contamination.”

Boise Co-Op Deli Reopened: “We are Confident . . .”

Following the efforts to clean and sanitize the deli, according to the Boise Co-Op, the CDHD “gave us the green light to resume food production . . . The first things to be up and running are the coffee bar, juice and smoothie bar, and some deli meats and cheeses.” The Deli finally became fully operational on June 22nd. The Boise Co-Op released this statement: “We are confident that we have taken steps to ensure the safety of food prepared in our Deli. The wellbeing of our customers is our highest priority. We want to prove to the Boise Co-op Community that we are a destination for food that is clean, safe, healthy, and delicious. We deeply regret any illnesses that have resulted from the Salmonella outbreak.”

The CDHD, while allowing the deli to reopen, has not yet determined the exact source of the Salmonella, and it may not be able to do so. What is does know is that Salmonella was found in the Boise Co-Op’s supply of raw turkey, tomatoes and onion, suggesting the possibility of cross-contamination. In response to this specific concern, one of the changes being adopted at the Boise Co-Op is the use of additional hand sinks and the use of color-coded cutting boards to prevent cross contamination between meats and vegetables, and raw and cooked foods.

Boise Co-Op Claim Center

The Salmonella lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates have set up a Boise Co-Op Claim Center for those who were impacted by the Salmonella outbreak and would like to talk to a Salmonella lawyer about preserving their important legal rights. Call 1-888-335-4901.