E. Coli Outbreak from Raw Pet Food Poisons Four People

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    E. Coli Outbreak from Raw Pet Food Poisons Four People
    E. Coli Outbreak from Raw Pet Food Poisons Four People

                Carnivora brand pet food sold in Canada has been recalled due to linked E. Coli contamination. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), the E. Coli O157 strain found in the raw pet food has infected four people who were contaminated while feeding their pet. The E. Coli is suspected to have spread from cross contamination after handling the infected pet food. The Canadian pet food company brand, Carnivora Pet Foods, is out of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, and is run by Riveriene Farm Ltd.. The recall was posted on June 12, 2020, recalling six different items: Carnivora Brand Whole Animal Chicken Dinner with Vegetables ‘n’ Fruit, Ultra Premium Fresh Frozen Patties for Dogs & Cats (4 lb / 1820g bag; UPC: 689076622271), Carnivora Brand Chicken Dinner with Vegetables ‘n’ Fruit (25 lb / 11.36 kg Bulk Box; UPC: 689076619677), Carnivora Brand Whole Animal Beef Dinner with Vegetables ‘n’ Fruit, Ultra Premium Fresh Frozen Patties for Dogs & Cats (4 lb / 1820g Bag; UPC: 689076622370), Carnivora Brand Beef Dinner with Vegetables ‘n’ Fruit (25 lb / 11.36 kg Bulk Box; UPC: 689076621076), Carnivora Brand Whole Animal Turkey Diet, Ultra Premium Fresh Frozen Patties for Dogs & Cats (4 lb / 1820g Bag; UPC: 689076623971), and Carnivora Brand Turkey Diet (25 lb / 11.36 kg Bulk Box; UPC: 689076624800). All six recalled products have date codes 13 01 20 / 006, 15 02 20 / 042, 20 01 20 / 006, and 20 02 20 / 042. Approximately 1,803 units of the affected product were nationwide between January 13, 2020, and June, 2020. Four people have reported E. Coli infections due to the contaminated pet food as of June 12, 2020, with those infected ranging from 3- 43 years old.

                According to the CDC, Shiga toxin-producing E. Coli (STEC) infections symptoms typically begin 3 to 4 days after exposure to the bacteria, though some report symptoms between 1 to 10 days after exposure. Symptoms of a STEC infection include classic food poisoning symptoms, such as vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps, as well as a low grade fever. STEC infections typically resolve without treatment within 5 to 7 days, though a healthcare provider should be contacted in cases with a high fever or severe diarrhea or vomiting.

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