FDA Announces Ongoing Investigation of E. Coli 0157:H7 Outbreak Linked to Spinach

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    Josie’s Organics Baby Spinach E. coli Lawyer Update: FDA and CDC Announces Investigation on Multi-State E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak Linked to Spinach.
    Josie’s Organics Baby Spinach E. coli Lawyer Update: FDA and CDC Announces Investigation on Multi-State E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak Linked to Spinach.

    FDA Announces Ongoing Investigation of E. Coli 0157:H7 Outbreak Linked to Spinach

    On November 16, 2021, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a report regarding the ongoing investigation of an E. coli 0157:H7 outbreak linked to Spinach. As of November 15, 2021, 10 people have been reported to be infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli 0157:H7 from 7 different states: South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. Cases of illnesses were reported to have begun between October 15 to October 27, 2021. The FDA, CDC, as well as state and local health authorities are working to determine the source of the multistate outbreak.

    Five of the ten people included in the outbreak reported having consumed spinach within a week of the onset of their illness. Consequently, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture collected a sample of Josie’s Organics Baby Spinach from the home of one of the ill people. The sample returned positive for the presence of E. coli 0157:H7 and is currently undergoing Whole Genome Sequence (WGS) testing in order to determine if it matches the outbreak strain.

    Health officials at the FDA have traced the positive spinach sample product back to a few farms in two different areas. Investigators will be visiting these farms to observe their agricultural health and safety practices, as well as to take samples for testing to determine if any of the farms are a potential source of the E. coli outbreak. In the meantime, the FDA is also working to determine if any other products besides spinach currently on the market may be a source of the outbreak.

    E. coli (Escherichia coli) are a type of bacteria commonly found in the environment, in food, and in the intestines of humans and animals. E. coli is a diverse bacteria of which many strains do not cause illness in humans and instead, play an important role in a healthy intestinal tract. However, certain types of pathogenic E. coli strains can cause inflammation of the intestinal tract, leading to symptoms such as severe diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting, and in some cases, certain life-threatening complications.

    Until further notice, the FDA urges consumers, restaurants, and retailers not to consume, serve, or sell Josie’s Organics Baby Spinach with the “best by” date of October 23, 2021. While this product is past its expiration date and should not be available for purchase anymore, consumers are encouraged to make sure it is not still in their freezers and if it is, to discard it.

    https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-e-coli-o157h7-spinach-november-2021?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

    https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2021/o157h7-11-21/index.html

    https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/ecoli-symptoms.html

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