Pet Treats Recalled Due to Possible Botulism: IcelandicPlus LLC out of Ft. Washington

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    Whole Capelin Pet Treats
    IcelandicPlus LLC out of Ft. Washington, PA, is voluntarily recalling their Whole Capelin Pet Treats due to the treats large size and related potential harm.

    Pet Treats Recalled Due to Possible Botulism

    IcelandicPlus LLC out of Ft. Washington, PA, is voluntarily recalling their Whole Capelin Pet Treats due to the treats large size and related potential harm. According to the FDA, salt-cured, fermented, or dried un-eviscerated fish over the length of 5 inches may be a source of food poisoning, specifically for botulism. Historically, several botulism outbreaks were traced to these fish between 1981 to 1987, and 1991 – although no outbreaks of botulism have ever been reported to be linked to IcelandicPlus LLC, specifically.  However, some of the Whole Capelin Pet Treats are over the guideline of 5 inches and are thus being recalled.

    The affected products are labeled Icelandic+ Capelin whole fish, PURE FISH TREATS FOR DOGS or PURE FISH TREATS FOR CATS with UPC codes 8 5485400775 9; 8 5485400711 7; and 8 5485400757 5. The product comes in clear plastic packaging in a 2.5 ounce tube or 1.5/2.5 ounce bag with “Best By” dates of 02/2020- 02/2022. Humans that come in contact with the treats and animals that ingest the treats are at risk for botulism; therefore, the treats should be disposed of immediately or returned to the place of purchase for a full refund.

    Botulism is caused by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, which produces a poisonous toxin most commonly found in canned meats and other preserved food, such as the Whole Capelin Pet Treats. The toxin attacks the body’s nervous system and produces symptoms similar to Guillan-Bare Syndrome. If not treated in time, botulism can be deadly as the toxin causes weakness in muscles, specifically the muscles used for breathing. The most common cause of death due to botulism is respiratory failure, which can now be treated through the use of ventilators. Botulism is treated with an antitoxin that prevents the toxin from attacking the nerves, although there is no drug to undo the toxin’s damage. If you suspect you have botulism, immediately contact your physician or go to an emergency room, as treating botulism is time sensitive.

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